Category Archives: Sustainability

New Wood Shelter

New series of short workshops

We would like to announce that we are now running a whole heap of short workshops focussing on the essential skills of food gardening. Topics include making compost, caring for chooks and a whole heap of other fun things!

Dates and details are in the link below. We hope to see more of you here soon!
https://healthyharvestnsw.wordpress.com/permaculturecourses/food-garden-favourites/

New workshop announced: Essential Aquaponics for the Backyard Grower

Essential Aquaponics for the Backyard Grower

When: Saturday 9th & Sunday 10th March, 9 am-3 pm

Where: Springwood, Blue Mountains

Cost:$75 (Early bird) $100 after Friday 1st March

We’ll show you how to raise beautifully fresh organic fish and vegetables in your own backyard using an easy and water efficient growing system!

Learn how to install and run a complete home aquaponics set-up for freshwater fish and veggies all year round.

Some great reasons to book yourself a place:

Know how: learn the key ideas and theory behind successful aquaponics systems

Confidence: get hands on practical experience using materials to build a system and learn to trouble shoot.

Affordable: We’ll show you how to build a system on a budget using affordable materials for a fraction of the price of some commercially available systems. The system we are working on (3 grow beds) should be large enough keep a small family in vegetables and fish and costs around $1000 in materials. I also will show you how to build a smaller system that only costs $100-$200 to make.

Ongoing support: we’ll help you with any questions you might have, both on the day and once you start your own system.

About the course

Dan aquaponicsThis workshop is a beginners course in aquaponics.

We will start with some introductory plant growing information as this is vital before attempting aquaponics. We will discuss garden placement, aspect, and the nutrient requirements of plants as well as some very basic permaculture design ideas.

The gardening introduction will start at approximately 9:30 and run until 11:am. If you feel you already have this knowledge, you are more than welcome to start a little bit later at 11am and join us for morning tea and to meet everyone before we start the aquaponics theory.

Practical demonstrations will involve learning the basic plumbing of an aquaponics setup so you can leave with the knowledge to build your own system, as well as how to trouble shoot and solve common aquaponics issues.389335_263492213749587_214943991937743_473355_910717026_n

Also, we will be building a couple of mini systems to demonstrate the workings of an aquaponics system. These will be large enough to grow a variety of greens and herbs but small enough to fit on even the smallest of balconies. These mini kits will be available for purchase at the end of the course and will cost $120 (to cover the cost of the materials). We will also learn how to grow seedlings specifically for use in an aquaponics system.

This workshop is suitable for all skill and fitness levels. No heavy physical work is involved.

Places are limited to ensure plenty of hands-on experience so bookings are essential.

What to bring

Please bring:

  • note pad, pen and something stable to write on (clipboard etc)
  • work gloves
  • a hat
  • sturdy boots
  • secateurs (if you own them)
  • sunscreen
  • water-bottle
  • a plate of healthy food to share at lunch

About the teacher

Daniel Hatfield is a passionate food gardener, educator and permaculturist. He has been working professionally with plants and gardens since 2006, focusing specifically on organic food gardening since 2008. Daniel believes in producing and promoting growing healthy, seasonal and local fruit and vegetables. He describes his practices as ‘beyond organic’. Daniel approaches food gardening from a wholistic perspective, addressing issues at their core, rather than use quick-fix sprays or fertilisers, either organic or inorganic. He enjoys sharing his passion for permaculture and helping people develop confidence and new skills in organic gardening.

Daniel takes his inspiration from the principles of Permaculture, as well as organic farmers such as Eliot Coleman and Joel Salatin. Daniel completed his Permaculture Design Certificate under Geoff Lawton at the Permaculture Research Institute, and holds tertiary degrees in art and photography.

What others have said about our workshops

We loved the workshop very much and found it practical and useful.Great fun and a good way to learn

good, very resourceful, learned a lot, true permie style – just thrown together and used what you have, got everyone involved

awesome stuff!! so inspired and knowledge hungry for more!! THANKYOU

it was informative and fun – you explained it all in a language to newbies could understand easily. Look forward to more workshops!

Absolutely loved it!

Practical, thought provoking. Made creating a garden seem like a realistic goal, even for a beginner. Lots of info, but didn’t get bogged down in the detail. I really enjoyed it!

I really enjoyed it. Thanks for having us at your home. I hope you benefit greatly as much as we have attending. I am inspired! :) good job!

We loved the workshop and learnt a lot

Length was perfect. Split between theory and practical was great. The lunch was brilliant.

Excellent – more, more!

Cost

The 2 day practical workshop costs $75 per person (Early bird) and $100 after Friday 1st March 2013. The price includes morning and afternoon tea.

Please complete the registration form below and we will send you an email with additional information.


The number of places is limited to 15 to facilitate an intensive learning experience. Please complete the booking form to register your interest.

Payment is available via bank transfer or credit card (details available on booking) or cheque or postal order payable to Daniel Hatfield.

Cancellation

Cancelled bookings will receive a full refund up until 2 weeks before the course. After that time you are welcome to transfer your booking to another person but the fee will be non-refundable. This course requires 6 people to go ahead.
Contact:

E: daniel@healthyharvest.com.au, P: 0431 383 516

From plan to reality- a mobile chicken coop that works!

We finally have a mobile chicken coop that is appropriate for our needs and that suits the landscape of the property!

I have kept chickens for coming on three years and would consider myself an over-protective parent. I still haven’t lost a chook to predators even though we have lived adjoining bush land the entire time and our neighbours have suffered losses. I also think I have made all the mistakes in coop design possible in the past and hopefully have remedied them all in my new design!

Old coop

The temporary barracks

The problem:

After we moved here, I had no chicken coop. I stumbled upon an old trampoline frame which I quickly converted using materials that I brought with me from the old house. Unfortunately, it was a bad design for the chickens, me, and the land. Access was poor for egg collection and it could only be placed in a couple of spots on the land that were flat enough. When the ground was too steep, the chickens wouldn’t use their roosts and they would slide around in the nesting boxes. We ended up with lots of broken eggs and egg eating became a bad habit for a couple of the younger chooks. At least 1-2 eggs were being lost each day. We had looked around for manufactured chicken coops that were suitable but we were unable to find any. It seemed all the coops were designed to sit on flat ground. Great, except that we have little to no flat ground!

The solution:

I came up with a concept of a coop that would suit everybody and was designed for our hilly, uneven landscape.  This new design is specifically planned to suit our needs. It is an exclusively free-ranging coop and is not a chicken tractor. The chickens roam outside during the day but are free to come in and out of the coop to lay at will. The chickens have no access to the soil whilst in the coop, but since they’re either laying or roosting most of the time that they’re in there it’s not really an issue. The floor is made of wood which I can easily fill with grass, straw and other treats, and just as easily empty out onto the garden or compost after they are finished with it.

Original design

Planning the palace

To work out how my dream coop would be, I needed to consider both the requirements of the chickens and the requirements of the humans using it.

The requirements of a chicken in the coop:

  • protection from weather and predators
  • access to food and clean water
  • enough space to nest and roost

Our requirements:

  • Access, access, access – it had to be easy to clean and change food/water, as well as good access to tend to brooding chooks (a big one most people don’t think about). If you are planning on raising chicks you need to be able to separate the brooding hen with the fertilised eggs from the rest of the group. If you don’t it can turn it to utter chaos. We have a separate small cage that has its own food and water and it can be placed inside the main coop. The brooding chook is placed in there for the gestation period and no other chickens can get in. If you try and take the broody chook away from the rest of the flock, she can stop being broody and then you lose the fertilised eggs.
  • Easy to move – although the new coop is quite large, I can move it alone by wheeling it around the property (though it’s much easier with 2 people).
  • Able to sit flat on a hillsideThe 2 front legs can be adjusted to different heights depending on the slope and there are wheels on the back. This also creates a shady space under the coop for chooks to rest on hot days or in rainy weather if they don’t want to go inside.

    dan and coop

    Almost ready

Cost and materials:

The coop cost about $200 in materials as I was able to use some recycled materials. The roof and sides were all tin (recycled) and the wheels came from a retired BMX from our local “Freecycle” network. If everything had been bought new, it would have been more like $400-500. (This cost excludes labour. This is not something a beginner can make. I had to get a fellow Permie friend, carpenter and all-round builder who was able to weld this up for me. I was lucky that he taught me to weld in the process so I can now make these sorts of things myself.)

New digs and area to scratch

A room with a view

No bones about it: a smart tip for zero food waste

Just a quick tip today about how to recycle all your household food waste. I was at a friend’s house on the weekend and I asked her what she did with her bones from cooking. She said that she put them in the bin. Since she composted everything else, I had just assumed she would compost the bones too. Then it occurred to me that maybe people don’t know how to deal with them!

Here is what we do. Put all the bones in a plastic bag in the freezer. Add to the same bag whenever you have bones. When it’s full or inconveniently large, use the bones in a hot compost or just simply dig a hole 30cm deep and bury them. That should be deep enough to keep rodents etc. away. Make sure your doggy doesn’t see you though! As long as you don’t let the bag defrost, you can keep using it.
Why should you bother with the bones? Although uncooked bones are a hundred times better than cooked bones, they still contain small amounts of nitrogen,  quite a lot of phosphorus and many other trace elements. Our land needs every bit of help we can give it to grow food. Otherwise it ends up at land fill and becomes a methane issue. Unfortunately 59% of landfill in Australia is organic matter. It’s easy to make a positive difference just by changing a few simple habits in the kitchen.

In hot water: a quick tip on how you could save power with your dishwasher

We finally have a kitchen after almost 4 months of no cooker and…well not much of anything. Yes, I know you are probably saying, “Here’s a dishwasher tip- don’t get one” or “Get rid of it” but we wanted one and we are pretty stingy with the rest of our power usage. We are currently using under 5kwh per day (average electricity use in Australia is 15kwh per day) and that is with an electric hob and oven (albeit the most efficient electric cooking I could find- we chose electric because gas is terrible for asthmatics like my wife Michelle). If we were using gas (or cooking with wood as we do in winter) our energy use can be as low as 3kwh per day.

When we were looking for  a dishwasher, I was more concerned about energy usage than water usage. The dishwasher we chose uses significantly less water than I was using hand washing and we are able to reuse our water in the garden, but once electricity is gone, it’s gone. We relied on ‘Choice‘ advice for the purchase (you might be surprised how many dishwashers don’t actually clean!). ‘Choice’ is an Australian grass roots consumer group. It is funded by subscription rather than advertising so it does not have any company allegiances and provides excellent impartial reviews and advice on all sorts of products. We ended up deciding on a Bosch “Classic”. It was a balance between water saving, energy saving, function, and price.

When I went to install it, the instructions said not to attach it to the hot water. I was gutted. I had made the assumption that they would just work with hot water like my washing machine. We have free solar hot water and I thought I would be able to take advantage of it. Still, I checked with the plumber and he thought it would be ok to hook it up to the hot tap.

power saving kit

Once it was installed, I borrowed an energy saving kit from my local library and conducted a “highly scientific” experiment to test the difference between running it on hot vs cold water. First, I hooked the dishwasher to the cold tap and ran the fastest cycle. This runs for 30 minutes at 45 degrees Celsius. The energy use was 0.5kwh.

Next, I ran it again using the hot tap and it used 0.3kw. That’s quite a large energy saving. In monetary terms it’s not huge but if you are a solar user it’s a big deal.

twin tap plumbing

If you think you might want to try this yourself, it’s a really easy retrofit for most kitchens with a sink mixer. A new tap (for the wall) can be bought that has 2 outlets on it. The sink mixer goes into one and the dishwasher in the other. Pretty easy fix for a significant energy saving. As always, it’s a good idea to get a professional to help you out.

Important:  my hot water comes through a mixing valve which makes it never hotter that 60 degrees Celsius. If you don’t have mixing valve, your water could be (in the case of solar) close to boiling point. This may destroy your dishwasher and harm your family or at least melt any plastic piping. You have been warned…don’t try this at home without checking first! 😉

Our new solar hot water system- it’s a little bit different!

After moving into the new house in early July, we’ve been enjoying hot water for a whole week now! It’s amazing what a difference it makes to your life and how much we take it for granted.

The house we bought had a hot water system but it was totally stuffed and unusable. We wanted a new system that didn’t depend on fossil fuels, which meant we were looking at solar or a heat pump. Heat pumps run permanently on electricity, even though they don’t use much of it, and feedback from others was that their lifespan barely exceeds warranty. So, solar seemed the logical choice.

Researching solar hot water systems took quite a long time but I think I got the right product in the end. I am always trying to find the least hi-tech solution for anything as technology is fantastic until it breaks down! I have seen a lot of solar water systems out there with more microchips than my computer. I also wanted a system that could be easily hooked up to a combustion stove to provide hot water on cloudy winter days. The last point may sound simple, however most modern systems make it hard: their solutions are very expensive and even more reliant on technology to add extra heat from a combustion stove. So look out if that’s what you want to set up.

Our choice of system (and why)

The system we bought is all stainless steel and uses no pumps. The system also uses evacuated tubes to capture the sun rather than a flat plate panel commonly seen on older models. Evacuated tubes are much more commonly used these days for a number of reasons:

  • They are like light bulbs in the way they can be individually replaced if one breaks, and they are only made in a few different sizes so they can be swapped from brand to brand.
  • They capture full sunlight up to 90 degrees east or west of north or (in simpler terms) from sunrise to sunset. Flat plate collectors only operate at optimum at midday.
  • Some reports say evacuated tubes are 168% more efficient than flat plate collectors in Australian conditions. Other reports say it’s more like 30-80%. I have never owned or operated a flat plate solar hot water system, so I cannot comment. All I can say is that on a sunny winter’s day (in the Blue Mountains NSW) that the system is reaching more than 80 degrees Celsius by 3pm (I can test this by turning on the electric override and it does not come on because the thermostat is set at 80).

Installation (with a little help from my friends)

Putting this system together took a lot of effort of my part and I felt like giving up a few times. I had to buy a kit from a dealer in Queensland who shipped it to Sydney. I had to collect it with my ute and put the frame together myself. I was going to put it on the roof myself but I got nervous wondering if the roof could hold the 400kg weight so I got a roofer to put the frame up and confirm that it was strong enough. It was all good and the roof was strong enough but I am not a builder and a roof collapsing is an expensive mistake. We had a few issues with the tiles anyway and he took care of them too all for a really good price. His name is Dave and his number is 0405 912 691. He is a licensed roofer in the Blue Mountains.

My friend Jordan and I then mounted the tank and the evacuated tubes on the roof which was a relatively easy task. Finding a plumber that was willing to plumb the system was another matter. I think I called at least 6 plumbers and although this system is incredibly simple to plumb, they were not willing to do it. I am not going to waste time bagging out the plumbers that didn’t return calls or that showed up to give quotes then disappeared never to be heard from again, but I will tell you who was keen (even excited) to do it. Brendon McClement in Hazelbrook Tel: 0417 264 678. Brendon has lots of experience installing solar systems as well as wetbacks/water jackets to combustion stoves. I think I have finally found a plumber to help me with my strange future experiments!

Some final thoughts

All up, our system cost about $4000 installed. The closest comparison price I found was $5500 (for a flatplate collector- which I didn’t actually want). We had a few teething problems including a broken water tube (my fault) but all in all it’s awesome. Solar hot water is not like having on-demand hot water reheating all the time like we have had in the past. We have an almost endless amount of hot water for the evening to wash the dishes, shower or bathe. In the morning there is enough hot water to again wash dishes etc. but I have not yet tried morning showers and I suspect it would run cool. Fortunately, we are evening showering people anyway. We can, of course, solve this by running the electric thermostat overnight to top the system back up, but that seems to defeat the purpose of having solar hot water when all that needs to be done is a little bit of shuffling of our water use habits. For us, we’re more than happy to be a little bit flexible with our water habits if it means we can reduce our electricity consumption by 50%. If you’re similarly concerned about the rising costs of power (some are predicting a price doubling in the next 5 years) then solar hot water might be a good option for your next system.

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Compost is hot, but chook mulch is hotter!

Compost vs mulch

Last post, I wrote about some of the finer points of successful composting. Compost is a great addition to your soil and is vital for making good seedlings. Still, making enough compost to regularly apply to your soil (as many books suggest) is often difficult, requiring excessive amounts of time and materials. If you have added lots of organic matter into your soil and you are happy with the state of it,  I do not think compost is regularly required (though it’s still a good idea to use a decent handful in the planting hole before planting out seedlings). However, for kick-starting a new garden with poor soil (or no soil as is the case for my new garden), you might initially bring in large amounts of compost or manures. Avoid “garden mixes” unless you are on clay as they have too much sand in them. If any readers have an entrepreneurial bent, a specially-made soil full of clay (rather than sand) would be a hit in the Blue Mountains!

Assuming your soil is good, here’s what I recommend, and what I do in my zone 1 garden. Make compost exclusively for seedlings and compost tea. For the rest of your garden, make chook mulch!

How to make chook mulch

1. If you have any spare land or lawn that just never gets used on your property, let the grass grow tall (rather than mowing it) and sow it with a “forage seed mix” that you can buy from rural supply shops. If you don’t have one of these places nearby, the grain in a poultry seed mix works just as well. If you don’t have spare space to grow grass and weeds you  might try a few other things:

    • Ask your neighbours for their grass clipping and weeds.
    • Find a nearby vacant block and ask if you can maintain it.
    • Look around. I recently found a place locally that the council mower men stash grass clippings which could be used for this same purpose.

Why grow your own mulch crops? A few words about plant diversity and plant health:

Unless you’re growing your own grasses and weeds to use in chook mulch, you’ll probably be buying it in the form of straw. Most straw is baled from fields of single crops like wheat, lucerne etc. All of those things are good but the real magic comes from having a diversity of plants in your mulch. Why? Different plants contain different essential elements that other plants require. Let’s use comfrey for an example. Comfrey contains: silica (to build cell walls); nitrogen (to promote leaf growth); magnesium (many uses including making other elements accessible to the plant); calcium (cell wall development and general growth); potassium (to help promote flowering and fruiting; and iron (which allows the plant to photosynthesise and transpire).

comfrey

The goal is to get as many of the essential elements plants need from the soil, into your mulch, and back into your garden. Here is a link to a list of plants you can grow that will help you create great mulch. These types of plants are called “dynamic accumulators”. As well as comfrey, some other common accumulators include carrot, parsley, and borage. These guys are great for bringing in beneficial insects too. Get to know them. They’re some of your best friends in the garden!

Grow lots of dynamic accumulators so you can feed them to your chooks, along with your weeds and grasses. That will ensure that the finished product is a feast of essential minerals for your garden.

parsley

borage

carrot

OK, so now you’ve got your mulch crop sorted…back to making chook mulch!

2. Get chooks and make a straw yard (a chook pen that you can throw straw into and collect it again later).

3. Now cut an armful (I use a 60 litre bin) of grass/forage crops/weeds every other day and give it to the chooks.

weeds, glorious weeds!

Buying a hand sickle or a “Kama” knife from Green Harvest here, will make this job (and many others) ten times easier.

Kama knife

Throw all your weeds in there too. This reduces the amount of grain you need to give to the chooks (I have found about 20% less), and they’ll eat the bits they like (including all the weed seeds) and kick around the grasses/weeds they don’t want to eat so they never has a chance to re-root.

Girls getting excited about the new grass delivery!

4. Let the chooks do their thing for a couple of days. Try to keep any new material away from the older stuff, e.g. up the other end of the straw-yard.

getting stuck in

5. Now you have mulch for free, which is also covered in manure! While teaching my most recent permaculture course I was asked if the fresh chicken manure in the mulch would harm the plants. If the fresh manure was dug into the soil, yes it may burn the roots of the plants. Recall from last article that if fresh organic matter is added above the soil, it slowly breaks down over time. We are just adding the mulch on top of the soil so it is of absolutely no harm. In fact, you can’t regularly buy mulch as good as this anywhere!

6. Apply chook mulch to your garden in a layer of approximately 15cm. Don’t skimp- sprinkling it on isn’t enough to work its magic.

Chook mulch is a winner. It gives you free mulch, happy chooks, delicious golden eggs, fantastic soil, and great gardens!

De-seeded and manured mulch: chook mulch!

Open now: weekend intensive “Practical Permaculture” course Saturday 30th June – Sunday 1st July

Practical Permaculture: Creative ways of designing and living for a more sustainable future

A two-day experiential course

Saturday 30th June & Sunday 1st July 2012

Facilitated by Daniel Hatfield and Gordon Williams

Venue: Private home and gardens in Railway Avenue, Faulconbridge, NSW 2776
(convenient for train, bus and free on-street parking)

Time: 9.00 am – 5.00 pm

Fee: $150 early bird (until 25th June) or $180 after 25th June

The number of participants is limited to 15 people to facilitate an intensive learning experience.

Join Permaculture teachers, designers & gardeners Daniel Hatfield and Gordon Williams for a weekend of intensive permaculture design, theory and practical workshops for the home gardener or backyard farmer.

Learn how to

  • Harness Permaculture principles and practical strategies to beat rising food and energy costs

  • Understand and apply Permaculture design techniques for a healthy, comfortable home and garden

  • Create your own Permaculture garden design and learn how to bring it to life!

Topics include:

  • efficient energy planning and systems
  • fundamentals of site design
  • climate and microclimate
  • landforms, soil and water
  • waste resources and systems
  • garden layout and design for urban, suburban and cold areas
  • orchards and food forests
  • animal forage systems and aquaculture
  • community strategies for engagement and action including urban food-growing, recycling and economics.

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Learning objectives

By the end of the course you will have:

A working understanding of permaculture designs and principles.

Ideas and confidence to create your own permaculture design project.

The pre-requisite skills and knowledge to complete a Permaculture Design Course.

Learning methods

A significant portion of the course comprises experiential learning. Practical demonstrations and small group workshops on key permaculture techniques are designed to bring to life and reinforce core theory and concepts.

The course provides a solid grounding in Permaculture theory, combining this with practical skill development through interactive learning experiences and course handouts. A range of learning methods are used including: presentations, video, experiential exercises, and small group activities.

About the teachers

Gordon Williams is a Permaculture consultant and educator currently working in Sydney and the Blue Mountains, NSW, Australia.

Raised in the Blue Mountains, Gordon was able to spend time in the surrounding national parks and bushland where he gained an appreciation for the natural systems within them. His six years of experience as a carpenter has led to a deep understanding of the difference between good and bad building design and construction. As a result of these experiences his passion is to see the built environment blend smoothly into the living surroundings.

Gordon’s journey along the Permaculture path began when he inherited the family kitchen garden. While on the hunt for information on growing food, Rosemary Morrow’s book ” Earth User’s Guide to Permaculture” proved to be a revelation.

Gordon has trained with some of Australia’s most respected Permaculture educators such as Rosemary Morrow, Darren Doherty and Geoff Lawton. He has also worked at the Permaculture Research Institute in both educational and on farm roles.

Daniel Hatfield is a passionate food gardener, educator and permaculturist. He has been working professionally with plants and gardens since 2006, focusing specifically on organic food gardening since 2008. Daniel believes in producing and promoting growing healthy, seasonal and local fruit and vegetables. He describes his practices as ‘beyond organic’. Daniel approaches food gardening from a wholistic perspective, addressing issues at their core, rather than use quick-fix sprays or fertilisers, either organic or inorganic. He enjoys sharing his passion for permaculture and helping people develop confidence and new skills in organic gardening.

Daniel takes his inspiration from the principles of Permaculture, as well as organic farmers such as Eliot Coleman and Joel Salatin. Daniel completed his Permaculture Design Certificate under Geoff Lawton at the Permaculture Research Institute, and holds tertiary degrees in art and photography.

What people are saying

The presenters, Daniel and Gordon, were knowledgeable and friendly. The course was a good mix of practical workshops and theory. The group size worked well and made for a cosy and enjoyable learning experience.

I had read a lot of books but discussing the theories, asking questions and hearing practical examples just helped cement it all. It seems to have stuck better..

Good interactions with the participants, lots of helpful diagrams, reference books and clear and lively delivery from both presenters.

The workshops were tailored really well. The right length, plenty of opportunity to get our hands dirty and a consistent but not overwhelming stream of information to accompany the practical skills.

Lots of fun and really informative. Great to get outside and practice some of the theory. AAA+++

Very good would recommend it to any one interested in growing food

Overall the course was fantastic. Daniel and Gordon were knowledgeable, enthusiastic and willing to share both knowledge and resources. I learnt so much more than I thought possible.

A BIG THANK YOU for the wonderful course, the beautiful venue(s) and the nourishing company. I would highly recommend the course.

Booking

The number of places is limited to 15 to facilitate an intensive learning experience. Please complete the booking form below and forward the course fee to D Hatfield, 10 Parkes Crescent, Faulconbridge NSW 2776 by 25th June 2012 for early-bird discount ($150) or by 29th June 2012 for regular payment ($180).

Payment available via bank transfer or credit card (details available on booking) or cheque or postal order payable to Daniel Hatfield.

Cancellation

Cancelled bookings will receive a full refund up until 2 weeks before the course. After that time you are welcome to transfer your booking to another person but the fee will be non-refundable. Please note that this course requires a minimum number of 10 participants to go ahead.
Contact:

E: daniel@healthyharvest.com.au, P: 0431 383 516

Weekend Intensive Course: Practical Permaculture for Home and Garden

Practical Permaculture: Creative ways of designing and living for a more sustainable future

A two-day experiential course

1st and 2nd of September 2012

ALSO

3rd and 4th of November 2012

Facilitated by Daniel Hatfield and Gordon Williams

Venue: Private home and gardens in the lower Blue Mountains
(convenient for train, bus and free on-street parking)

Time: 9.00 am – 5.00 pm

Fee: September course $150 early bird by 18th of August or $180 thereafter.

November course $150 early bird by 19th of October or $180 thereafter.


The number of participants is limited to facilitate an intensive learning experience.

Join Permaculture teachers, designers & gardeners Daniel Hatfield and Gordon Williams for a weekend of intensive permaculture design, theory and practical workshops for the home gardener or backyard farmer.

Learn how to

  • Harness Permaculture principles and practical strategies to beat rising food and energy costs

  • Understand and apply Permaculture design techniques for a healthy, comfortable home and garden

  • Create your own Permaculture garden design and learn how to bring it to life!

Topics include:

  • efficient energy planning and systems
  • fundamentals of site design
  • climate and microclimate
  • landforms, soil and water
  • waste resources and systems
  • garden layout and design for urban, suburban and cold areas
  • orchards and food forests
  • animal forage systems and aquaculture
  • community strategies for engagement and action including urban food-growing, recycling and economics.

Learning objectives

By the end of the course you will have:

A working understanding of permaculture designs and principles.

Ideas and confidence to create your own permaculture design project.

The pre-requisite skills and knowledge to complete a Permaculture Design Course.

Learning methods

A significant portion of the course comprises experiential learning. Practical demonstrations and small group workshops on key permaculture techniques are designed to bring to life and reinforce core theory and concepts.

The course provides a solid grounding in Permaculture theory, combining this with practical skill development through interactive learning experiences and course handouts. A range of learning methods are used including: presentations, video, experiential exercises, and small group activities.

About the teachers

Gordon Williams is a Permaculture consultant and educator currently working in Sydney and the Blue Mountains, NSW, Australia.

Raised in the Blue Mountains, Gordon was able to spend time in the surrounding national parks and bushland where he gained an appreciation for the natural systems within them. His six years of experience as a carpenter has led to a deep understanding of the difference between good and bad building design and construction. As a result of these experiences his passion is to see the built environment blend smoothly into the living surroundings.

Gordon’s journey along the Permaculture path began when he inherited the family kitchen garden. While on the hunt for information on growing food, Rosemary Morrow’s book ” Earth User’s Guide to Permaculture” proved to be a revelation.

Gordon has trained with some of Australia’s most respected Permaculture educators such as Rosemary Morrow, Darren Doherty and Geoff Lawton. He has also worked at the Permaculture Research Institute in both educational and on farm roles.

Daniel Hatfield is a passionate food gardener, educator and permaculturist. He has been working professionally with plants and gardens since 2006, focusing specifically on organic food gardening since 2008. Daniel believes in producing and promoting growing healthy, seasonal and local fruit and vegetables. He describes his practices as ‘beyond organic’. Daniel approaches food gardening from a wholistic perspective, addressing issues at their core, rather than use quick-fix sprays or fertilisers, either organic or inorganic. He enjoys sharing his passion for permaculture and helping people develop confidence and new skills in organic gardening.

Daniel takes his inspiration from the principles of Permaculture, as well as organic farmers such as Eliot Coleman and Joel Salatin. Daniel completed his Permaculture Design Certificate under Geoff Lawton at the Permaculture Research Institute, and holds tertiary degrees in art and photography.

Booking

The number of places is limited to facilitate an intensive learning experience. Please complete the booking form below and forward the course fee by May 3rd to D Hatfield, 10 Parkes Crescent, Faulconbridge NSW 2776.

Payment available via bank transfer (details available on booking) or cheque or postal order payable to Daniel Hatfield.

Cancellation

Cancelled bookings will receive a full refund up until April 20th. After April 20th you are welcome to transfer your booking to another person but the fee will be non-refundable. Please note that this course requires a minimum number of 10 participants to go ahead.
Contact:

E: daniel@healthyharvest.com.au, P: 0431 383 516

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