Category Archives: Gardening techniques

Our Soil Blocking Recipe

Soil blocks ready to seed

Just a quick post on our soil blocking recipe. I always get asked about this and usually point people to the All Sun farm recipe, but I have refined this recipe over the last few years.

Here’s my mix:

  • 2.5 part coco peat (aka coir)

I don’t like the small bricks that you can get in Bunnies etc. as you need to soak them. It is very hard to mix all the other ingredients together well after that. I would say that the bricks are detrimental to the mix unless you soak them and then dry them again and that takes a long time (like a week). I buy it by the bale from Elders in Windsor in a dry form. It is compressed but not like the bricks.

Worm castings also work great but unfortunately nothing you can buy  (like potting mix) seems to work

  • 0.5 part fine basalt dust

That can be hard to find for some people so you can use river sand or horticultural sand. DO NOT USE ANY OTHER SAND. Other types of sand (like sand pit or Sydney sand do not work. It’s not that they don’t work as well but they actually make the seedlings fail catastrophically. Sandpit sand, Sydney sand, brickies sand etc. hold too much water. Your seedlings will turn in to a fungal mess. Try it at your peril.

And some nutrients…

I don’t have a specific measure for these but I use a double hand scoop of each for a full wheel barrow as a guide.

  • Kelp meal

You can get this from rural supplies and horse type places. It should cost about $100 for a 25kg bag.

Be aware of what you are getting. The “meal” part is important. If you try and get the finely ground water soluble kelp, it will cost around $800 per bag.

  • Soft rock phosphate

It is a really vital part of the recipe while your soil is poor.Unfortunately this is hard to get in the ‘burbs by the bag (as opposed to the tonne- you can get it from YLAD in  Young by the tonne). If you find somewhere please let me know.

I get it from a rural supplier in Queensland when I visit relatives. I bought 100kg 3 years ago and still have 20kg left.

  • Blood and bone

I only use this is the recipe during the warmer months, ie. Sept – March. Plants don’t feed as much during the winter and I find using it then promotes fungal growth. I would say it’s essential for summer.

*Note: the phosphate and blood and bone should be provided by your compost mix through the use of dynamic accumulators

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Healthy Harvest in the news

This week I was interviewed by a journalist at the Illawarra Mercury newspaper regarding the organic gardening workshop I’m teaching in Wollongong next weekend, as well as organic gardening in general. You can read the article here, and check out the workshop details here.

Easter Special: 20% off all garden consultation and design services

We’re celebrating the Easter holiday with a special saving for our internet followers!

Take a huge 20% off any garden consultation or design package!

Home visit +1 hr of personalised professional advice

was $60 now $48

Home visit +  1 hr consultation +  written report

was $300 now  $240

Want your own kitchen garden? Get the right advice and solutions for your new food garden or bring an old one back to life.

Sloping, rocky, small or problem block? Yes, you CAN have a fantastic food garden!

Your personal kitchen garden consultation by a qualified Permaculture designer

A plan that’s unique, and maximises your aspect and features in the best way for a gorgeous and productive garden.

First, you’ll have a home consultation to discuss your situation, wants, and ideas.

Then, you can choose to add a personalised program of care and advice specifically for your location and needs, and even a 2D design for your future garden.

Whatever you choose, you’ll get reliable, professional advice that’s right for your situation.

Sample design: intensive fruit garden

Which option is right for you?

Option A: $60 now $48

Perfect for when you have a basic concept for what you would like from your kitchen garden and want some help getting started.

Home consultation

I’ll visit you to discuss your space and ideas, as well as potential challenges. I’ll also give you effective, environmentally sound ideas and tips for how to best turn your ideas into reality.

Option B: $300 now $240

Turn your dream into reality with a home visit, great practical ideas, plus a report filled with creation and management advice and details to make it happen!

Home consultation

PLUS

Written report including links to relevant websites and suppliers

Want more? You can also order a 2D design of your future garden for as little as $180 (average design $200-$250)

All the expertise and help you need to start growing and enjoying fresh fruit and veggies from your own kitchen garden!

1 hr home visit consultations are available within greater Sydney area only. We also offer phone/Skype consultations for clients who live outside the greater Sydney area. You just need to provide us with photos and an overhead map (such as in a contract of sale) of the site.

We offer  home visits to Central Coast, Bathurst and Wollongong (approx. 2 hours of Springwood, Blue Mountains) clients who book a consult plus written report or design services.

Call me on ph:0431 383 516 or fill in the form below to book your time and I’ll get back to you.

*Bookings must be made by Tuesday 2/4/13 to claim this discount.

New series of short workshops

We would like to announce that we are now running a whole heap of short workshops focussing on the essential skills of food gardening. Topics include making compost, caring for chooks and a whole heap of other fun things!

Dates and details are in the link below. We hope to see more of you here soon!
https://healthyharvestnsw.wordpress.com/permaculturecourses/food-garden-favourites/

New workshop announced: Essential Aquaponics for the Backyard Grower

Essential Aquaponics for the Backyard Grower

When: Saturday 9th & Sunday 10th March, 9 am-3 pm

Where: Springwood, Blue Mountains

Cost:$75 (Early bird) $100 after Friday 1st March

We’ll show you how to raise beautifully fresh organic fish and vegetables in your own backyard using an easy and water efficient growing system!

Learn how to install and run a complete home aquaponics set-up for freshwater fish and veggies all year round.

Some great reasons to book yourself a place:

Know how: learn the key ideas and theory behind successful aquaponics systems

Confidence: get hands on practical experience using materials to build a system and learn to trouble shoot.

Affordable: We’ll show you how to build a system on a budget using affordable materials for a fraction of the price of some commercially available systems. The system we are working on (3 grow beds) should be large enough keep a small family in vegetables and fish and costs around $1000 in materials. I also will show you how to build a smaller system that only costs $100-$200 to make.

Ongoing support: we’ll help you with any questions you might have, both on the day and once you start your own system.

About the course

Dan aquaponicsThis workshop is a beginners course in aquaponics.

We will start with some introductory plant growing information as this is vital before attempting aquaponics. We will discuss garden placement, aspect, and the nutrient requirements of plants as well as some very basic permaculture design ideas.

The gardening introduction will start at approximately 9:30 and run until 11:am. If you feel you already have this knowledge, you are more than welcome to start a little bit later at 11am and join us for morning tea and to meet everyone before we start the aquaponics theory.

Practical demonstrations will involve learning the basic plumbing of an aquaponics setup so you can leave with the knowledge to build your own system, as well as how to trouble shoot and solve common aquaponics issues.389335_263492213749587_214943991937743_473355_910717026_n

Also, we will be building a couple of mini systems to demonstrate the workings of an aquaponics system. These will be large enough to grow a variety of greens and herbs but small enough to fit on even the smallest of balconies. These mini kits will be available for purchase at the end of the course and will cost $120 (to cover the cost of the materials). We will also learn how to grow seedlings specifically for use in an aquaponics system.

This workshop is suitable for all skill and fitness levels. No heavy physical work is involved.

Places are limited to ensure plenty of hands-on experience so bookings are essential.

What to bring

Please bring:

  • note pad, pen and something stable to write on (clipboard etc)
  • work gloves
  • a hat
  • sturdy boots
  • secateurs (if you own them)
  • sunscreen
  • water-bottle
  • a plate of healthy food to share at lunch

About the teacher

Daniel Hatfield is a passionate food gardener, educator and permaculturist. He has been working professionally with plants and gardens since 2006, focusing specifically on organic food gardening since 2008. Daniel believes in producing and promoting growing healthy, seasonal and local fruit and vegetables. He describes his practices as ‘beyond organic’. Daniel approaches food gardening from a wholistic perspective, addressing issues at their core, rather than use quick-fix sprays or fertilisers, either organic or inorganic. He enjoys sharing his passion for permaculture and helping people develop confidence and new skills in organic gardening.

Daniel takes his inspiration from the principles of Permaculture, as well as organic farmers such as Eliot Coleman and Joel Salatin. Daniel completed his Permaculture Design Certificate under Geoff Lawton at the Permaculture Research Institute, and holds tertiary degrees in art and photography.

What others have said about our workshops

We loved the workshop very much and found it practical and useful.Great fun and a good way to learn

good, very resourceful, learned a lot, true permie style – just thrown together and used what you have, got everyone involved

awesome stuff!! so inspired and knowledge hungry for more!! THANKYOU

it was informative and fun – you explained it all in a language to newbies could understand easily. Look forward to more workshops!

Absolutely loved it!

Practical, thought provoking. Made creating a garden seem like a realistic goal, even for a beginner. Lots of info, but didn’t get bogged down in the detail. I really enjoyed it!

I really enjoyed it. Thanks for having us at your home. I hope you benefit greatly as much as we have attending. I am inspired! :) good job!

We loved the workshop and learnt a lot

Length was perfect. Split between theory and practical was great. The lunch was brilliant.

Excellent – more, more!

Cost

The 2 day practical workshop costs $75 per person (Early bird) and $100 after Friday 1st March 2013. The price includes morning and afternoon tea.

Please complete the registration form below and we will send you an email with additional information.


The number of places is limited to 15 to facilitate an intensive learning experience. Please complete the booking form to register your interest.

Payment is available via bank transfer or credit card (details available on booking) or cheque or postal order payable to Daniel Hatfield.

Cancellation

Cancelled bookings will receive a full refund up until 2 weeks before the course. After that time you are welcome to transfer your booking to another person but the fee will be non-refundable. This course requires 6 people to go ahead.
Contact:

E: daniel@healthyharvest.com.au, P: 0431 383 516

NEW WORKSHOP DATE ANNOUNCED: Organic gardening for the backyard farmer

Organic Gardening for the Backyard Farmer

Saturday & Sunday 9th & 10th February 2013

Springwood, Blue Mountains

9am-5pm

Workshop structure

Morning: Theory The morning will consist of a 1.5 hour theory lesson which will include time for questions and answers.

Rest of the day: Practical experience. The rest of the day focuses on practical implementation of some of the things discussed.

Morning Tea: We will break at 10.30am for half an hour. We will provide tea, coffee, biscuits and fruit.

Lunch: We will break for lunch at 12.30pm for 1 hour to share a meal and lively conversation together. Please bring a plate of food to share for lunch.

Afternoon Tea: We will break at 3pm for half an hour. We will provide teas, coffee, biscuits and fruit.

What you’ll learn

Learn how to make real compost

I will show you how to make a compost superior to ANYTHING you can purchase from a shop. You’ll also learn how to make it on a small or large scale. Far too many weeds end up in land fill but are full of minerals that need to be returned to your soil. I will show you how to kill the weed seeds and make great compost from garden waste. You will also learn about the nutritional requirements of your plants and how to keep your soil (and your plants) in good shape.

Use chickens as part of your vegetable growing system

Chickens are a valuable part of an organic gardener’s tool kit. Chickens eat all your bugs and weeds, scratch and till the soil and give you free fertiliser. Learn how to use chickens efficiently and constructively (not destructively) as part of your garden system. We will be moving my chickens from their current home into another area. You can find out more about a similar growing system in this article. Bring along your best chicken-rustling boots!

Learn to sow seeds and propagate plants

Learning to sow seeds and propagate plants can be one of the largest cost savers in your self sufficient food gardening system. Learn the basic techniques and tools to sow seeds and take cuttings. We will also reveal the recipe for potting mix which is often the difference between success and failure.

Build a raised bed garden on contour

This will be the main part of the workshop and lots of fun. This type of garden can be built almost ANYWHERE irrespective of slope or the quality of your soil (it can even be built on a concrete slab). In some areas where we will be building, we don’t even have soil. It’s bedrock.

Contour gardens also catch virtually all run off water and store it for later use. The bed is constructed using a similar technique to “No dig” or “Lasagne” gardens. We will be building the garden on contour almost from scratch. You will learn how to survey your land using simple, easy to make tools (from scrap wood or tree branches).

What to bring

Please bring:

Note pad, pen and something stable to write on (clipboard etc)

gardening gloves

a hat

sturdy boots/ (gum boots if it’s wet)

Secateurs (if you own them)

a Spade (if you own one)

sunscreen

water-bottle

a plate of healthy food to share at lunch

About the teacher

Daniel Hatfield is a passionate food gardener, educator and permaculturist. He has been working professionally with plants and gardens since 2006, focusing specifically on organic food gardening since 2008. Daniel believes in producing and promoting growing healthy, seasonal and local fruit and vegetables. He describes his practices as ‘beyond organic’. Daniel approaches food gardening from a wholistic perspective, addressing issues at their core, rather than use quick-fix sprays or fertilisers, either organic or inorganic. He enjoys sharing his passion for permaculture and helping people develop confidence and new skills in organic gardening.

Daniel takes his inspiration from the principles of Permaculture, as well as organic farmers such as Eliot Coleman and Joel Salatin. Daniel completed his Permaculture Design Certificate under Geoff Lawton at the Permaculture Research Institute, and holds tertiary degrees in art and photography.

What others have said about our workshops:

I had a great time…I like hands on stuff and I feel much more confident about making compost…I knew it was important for my garden and now I can do it…and using the paper and straw and pocket planting is how I am going to finish of my verge.

We loved the workshop very much and found it practical and useful.

Great fun and a good way to learn

good, very resourceful, learned a lot, true permie style – just thrown together and used what you have, got everyone involved

awesome stuff!! so inspired and knowledge hungry for more!! THANKYOU

it was informative and fun – you explained it all in a language to newbies could understand easily. Look forward to more workshops!

Absolutely loved it!

I really enjoyed it. Thanks for having us at your home. I hope you benefit greatly as much as we have attending. I am inspired! :) good job!

we loved the workshop and learnt alot

Length was perfect. Split between theory and practical was great. The lunch was brilliant.

Thanks Daniel. It is always great to see how people manage their own blocks. The reinforcement of good planning before execution of a (great) idea is always appreciated.

Excellent – more, more!

Cost

The 2 day practical workshop costs $75 per person (Early bird) and $100 after Friday 1st February 2013. The price includes morning and afternoon tea.

Safety Note: Although your skill level is not important, my block is steep in areas and you will need to be able to walk easily on grassy slopes which may be slippery. These workshops are unfortunately unsuitable for people with any walking related issues or disabilities.

Please fill in the form below to reserve your place.


The number of places is limited to 15 to facilitate an intensive learning experience. Please complete the booking form to register your interest.

Payment is available via bank transfer or credit card (details available on booking) or cheque or postal order payable to Daniel Hatfield.

Cancellation

Cancelled bookings will receive a full refund up until 2 weeks before the course. After that time you are welcome to transfer your booking to another person but the fee will be non-refundable. Please note that this course requires a minimum number of 10 participants to go ahead.
Contact:

E: daniel@healthyharvest.com.au, P: 0431 383 516

Kitchen Garden Update

The Kitchen Garden is expanding week by week. This weekend we are running our “Organic Gardening” Workshop and have built an extension to the kitchen garden as part of an exercise. This area (top right of the picture with the sticks) is home to perennial vegetables (things that grow for several years) such as asparagus, artichoke and herbs like Oregano etc. This garden is also now full of flowers to bring in all the beneficial bugs. We extended the garden right up on to the nature strip where a wind break, using acacia, was planted.

IMG_1501

What’s up, Doc? Grow great carrots with these easy steps!

Many people struggle growing carrots for a variety of reasons, but it doesn’t need to be so. Follow these  simple rules and it’s easy!

Common carrot problems

1) Growing tiny or stunted  carrots: Firstly, it is virtually impossible to grow carrots from seedlings. It has been tried over the years by the best and everyone fails. “But you can buy carrot seedlings from nurseries!” I hear you say! Yes, you can buy a lot of cons from nurseries, such as “compost activator” if you want. It doesn’t mean it will work! Basically, any vegetable with a tap root (or that the tap root is the edible part you are after) should be avoided as seedlings: parsnip, carrot and beetroot just to name a few. (If you are a soil block user, beetroot can be successfully grown but it is the only exception).

You have to thin carrots quite early on. If you disturb the tap root of a carrot (or any other tap rooted plant for that matter) they simply stop growing downwards. Just use 2 fingers width as a distance measure between the keepers, and pull the smaller seedlings out in between the ones you want to keep. If you only ever want to eat baby carrots, do the same thing but only use one finger width as a guide.

2) Forked carrots (they often look like little people with their bits in the right places).  Forking can be attributed to either stones in the ground, or over-feeding. Carrots love growing in sandy soil and don’t require to be fertilised very much.

3) Germination of the seeds. Carrot seeds (being so small) cannot be covered very deeply with soil. This means they sit virtually on the surface and once they are wet, they need to be continuously damp to germinate well.

How to fix your carrot problems?

There are a few tricks you can find on the net but I can only tell you what works for me. I don’t like being a slave to the garden so watering carrot seeds up to three times a day doesn’t suit me very well. This technique below may seem a bit time consuming but it is part of establishing a new garden bed (I’m doing a lot of this at the moment). In 6 months it will be a lot simpler once the soil is more fertile and stone-free.

My recipe for carrot success

1. Wait for a period of weather that is forecast to be wet for several days in a row.

Weather forecast

Weather forecast

2. Find an appropriate place to plant your carrot seeds

Mulched bed

Mulched bed

3. In the case of a newly made garden with stones etc., dig a carrot sized hole (to the size the carrot will be at maturity).

Carrot depth hole dug

Carrot depth hole dug

4. Remove any stones from the planting hole, even little ones. If required (my garden is new and the soil is poor) add a bit of extra compost to the planting hole.

Stones removed from planting hole

Stones removed from planting hole

5.  I like to put the carrot seeds that I will be using in a dry container. Why? Well, as you can see, this it a pretty dirty job. If I have dirt on my hands, I won’t put them in a seed packet (unless I intend on using all the seeds) because I don’t want the risk of wetting or getting a soil-borne disease into the packet. This hard container also makes it easy to hold on an angle and tap the seeds out.

Seeds in dry container

Seeds in dry container

6. Sprinkle the seeds in the planting hole. I will expect to be able to grow 4 carrots in this area after thinning. Lightly cover afterwards with a very fine soil up to a depth of 2mm. Unfortunately carrot seeds won’t germinate easily through mulch. Walk away and allow the rain to do its thing

Seeds planted

Seeds planted

Companion plants for carrots include onions, leeks, lettuce and beans.  In warmer months, carrots will happily grow in the shade of taller plants like tomato and celery. Spring-Summer carrots takes about 12 weeks from seed to harvest. In cooler months, it’s more like 18 weeks.

 

Seven days later, the seeds are emerging.

Seeds germinating

Seeds germinating

 

Its now the end of January and we have been harvesting small amounts of carrots for about two weeks. I have been planting new seeds at every wet opportunity (and otherwise fortnightly to keep up with the household carrot demand). Now the garden beds are starting to build lovely new top soil (through the decomposition of the heavy mulch) I am not needing to add compost to the planting holes (instead I cover the surrounding area with mulch to create future soil). I am also finding I can cover the seeds with a layer of very loose, thinly spread mulch. The compost I was initially using was a bought product that I used to get the garden started. Although its pretty good for bought compost it’s a bit dry and dusty so doesn’t retain water very well. Bought compost doesn’t compare to real soil or home made compost for that matter. Germination rates are much higher now in the newly amended soil.

 

Carrots ready to harvest from their planting pocket. I originally thought I would get four carrots per hole but this one comfortably has seven good sized carrots after thinning out the little ones.

Carrots ready

 

Some carrots sitting comfortably among the lettuce, silverbeet and radish.

Carrot leaves

 

This picture is for scale. The carrot is about 10cm (the main part of the flesh and not the long taproot).

I have chosen to grow a variety called Scarlet Nantes  as it is a smaller carrot and suitable for growing in poor or heavy soils. The bend in the carrot is due to it hitting another carrot whilst growing or a perhaps a stone. It’s not a big deal.

As my soil improves I will move on to other carrots like All Season. It’s a better tasting carrot (and larger) but if I had tried this variety initially, I think my success rate would have been much worse. I have tried that variety before in poor unimproved soil with limited success.

Carrot to scale

NEW WORKSHOP ANNOUNCED: Organic Gardening for the Backyard Farmer

Saturday & Sunday 8th & 9th December

Springwood, Blue Mountains

9am-5pm

Workshop structure

Morning: Theory The morning will consist of a 1.5 hour theory lesson which will include time for questions and answers.

Rest of the day: Practical experience. The rest of the day focuses on practical implementation of some of the things discussed.

Morning Tea: We will break at 10.30am for half an hour. We will provide tea, coffee, biscuits and fruit.

Lunch: We will break for lunch at 12.30pm for 1 hour to share a meal and lively conversation together. Please bring a plate of food to share for lunch.

Afternoon Tea: We will break at 3pm for half an hour. We will provide teas, coffee, biscuits and fruit.

What you’ll learn

Learn how to make real compost

I will show you how to make a compost superior to ANYTHING you can purchase from a shop. You’ll also learn how to make it on a small or large scale. Far too many weeds end up in land fill but are full of minerals that need to be returned to your soil. I will show you how to kill the weed seeds and make great compost from garden waste. You will also learn about the nutritional requirements of your plants and how to keep your soil (and your plants) in good shape.

Use chickens as part of your vegetable growing system

Chickens are a valuable part of an organic gardener’s tool kit. Chickens eat all your bugs and weeds, scratch and till the soil and give you free fertiliser. Learn how to use chickens efficiently and constructively (not destructively) as part of your garden system. We will be moving my chickens from their current home into another area. You can find out more about a similar growing system in this article. Bring along your best chicken-rustling boots!

Learn to sow seeds and propagate plants

Learning to sow seeds and propagate plants can be one of the largest cost savers in your self sufficient food gardening system. Learn the basic techniques and tools to sow seeds and take cuttings. We will also reveal the recipe for potting mix which is often the difference between success and failure.

Build a raised bed garden on contour

This will be the main part of the workshop and lots of fun. This type of garden can be built almost ANYWHERE irrespective of slope or the quality of your soil (it can even be built on a concrete slab). In some areas where we will be building, we don’t even have soil. It’s bedrock.

Contour gardens also catch virtually all  run off water and store it for later use. The bed is constructed using a similar technique to “No dig” or “Lasagne” gardens. We will be building the garden on contour almost from scratch. You will learn how to survey your land using simple, easy to make tools (from scrap wood or tree branches).

What to bring

Please bring:

Note pad, pen and something stable to write on (clipboard etc)

gardening gloves

a hat

sturdy boots/ (gum boots if it’s wet)

Secateurs (if you own them)

a Spade (if you own one)

A wheelbarrow (again if you own one and only if you have a ute or van. Please don’t try getting one in a Barina or on the train!)

sunscreen

water-bottle

a plate of healthy food to share at lunch

About the teacher

Daniel Hatfield is a passionate food gardener, educator and permaculturist. He has been working professionally with plants and gardens since 2006, focusing specifically on organic food gardening since 2008. Daniel believes in producing and promoting growing healthy, seasonal and local fruit and vegetables. He describes his practices as ‘beyond organic’. Daniel approaches food gardening from a wholistic perspective, addressing issues at their core, rather than use quick-fix sprays or fertilisers, either organic or inorganic. He enjoys sharing his passion for permaculture and helping people develop confidence and new skills in organic gardening.

Daniel takes his inspiration from the principles of Permaculture, as well as organic farmers such as Eliot Coleman and Joel Salatin. Daniel completed his Permaculture Design Certificate under Geoff Lawton at the Permaculture Research Institute, and holds tertiary degrees in art and photography.

What others have said about our workshops:

Great fun and a good way to learn

good, very resourceful, learned a lot, true permie style – just thrown together and used what you have, got everyone involved

awesome stuff!! so inspired and knowledge hungry for more!! THANKYOU

it was informative and fun – you explained it all in a language to newbies could understand easily. Look forward to more workshops!

Absolutely loved it!

I really enjoyed it. Thanks for having us at your home. I hope you benefit greatly as much as we have attending. I am inspired!  🙂 good job!

we loved the workshop and learnt alot

Length was perfect. Split between theory and practical was great. The lunch was brilliant.

Thanks Daniel. It is always great to see how people manage their own blocks. The reinforcement of good planning before execution of a (great) idea is always appreciated.

Excellent – more, more!

Cost

The 2 day practical workshop costs $75 per person (Early bird) and $100 after Friday 30th November. The price includes morning and afternoon tea.

Safety Note: Although your skill level is not important, my block is steep in areas and you will need to be able to walk easily on grassy slopes which may be slippery. These workshops are unfortunately unsuitable for people with any walking related issues or disabilities.

Please fill in the form below to reserve your place.

Booking

The number of places is limited to 15 to facilitate an intensive learning experience. Please complete the booking form  to register your interest.

Payment is available via bank transfer or credit card (details available on booking) or cheque or postal order payable to Daniel Hatfield.

Cancellation

Cancelled bookings will receive a full refund up until 2 weeks before the course. After that time you are welcome to transfer your booking to another person but the fee will be non-refundable. Please note that this course requires a minimum number of 10 participants to go ahead.
Contact:

E: daniel@healthyharvest.com.au, P: 0431 383 516


Shock Therapy

 

Just a quick post of some pictures that I wanted to share. After moving house in July, I transplanted a number of smaller fruit trees. Most did fine but my small Tahitian lime didn’t look too great with the leaves yellowing and drying up. I recently read about a technique in a Sepp Holzer book called “the shock method” of transplanting. I though I would give it a go as the plant was about to die. The idea is that you strip all the leaves, fruit and flowers off the plant and it will put all its energy into root production. It could be coincidental but it worked for me. The plant has loads of new shoots.

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